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Table 1 Rates & Precipitants of Self-harm in South Asian Women in the UK

From: Self-harm in British South Asian women: psychosocial correlates and strategies for prevention

Author(s) Method Rates Precipitants
Burke (1976) Retrospective case note study South Asian Males n = 24 Females n = 28 2 times the rate of South Asian men, low when compared to the general population. Interpersonal disputes
Merrill & Owens (1986) Crossectional patients admitted to the hospital after deliberate self harm South Asian Males n = 50 Females n = 146 3 times the rate of South Asian men, higher than UK-born females Marital problems, arranged marriages rejections of arranged marriage proposals, cultural conflict
Neeleman et al, (1996) Cross sectional Case notes of all patients referred to a hospital based DSH team over a six month period. Indian females: 2.6 All Asian females (Indian, Pakistani, Bangladeshi, Chinese, & Asian others): 1.68 as compared to whites. UK born Indian females rates were 7.8 times those of UK born white females  
Bhugra et al (1999) Crossectional (A&E, general medical, psychiatric services) South Asian Males n = 24 Females n = 65 1.6 times the rate of white women and 2.5 times the rate of South Asian men. Young Asian females (i.e. = 30 years) 2.5 times the rate of white women and 7 times the rate of South Asian men. Gender role expectations, pressure for arranged marriage, individualisation and culture conflict
Cooper et al, (2006) Prospective (A&E) South Asian Males n = 76 Females n = 223 Young South Asian women (16–24 years) 1.5 fold increase in risk compared to White women in the same age group. South Asian women over 5 times more likely to self-harm than South Asian men. Relationship problems with family