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  • Open Access

Temporal lobe factor in verb fluency

  • 1
Annals of General Psychiatry20065 (Suppl 1) :S111

https://doi.org/10.1186/1744-859X-5-S1-S111

  • Published:

Keywords

  • Public Health
  • Regression Analysis
  • Dementia
  • Cognitive Impairment
  • Brain Region

Background

This study evaluated whether decreased word fluency in Mild Cognitive Impairment and related disorders is related to hypoperfusion in particular brain regions.

Materials and methods

93 subjects referred for memory trouble participated in the study. Subjects had either Subjective (non-objective) Cognitive Impairment, Mild (Objective) Cognitive) Impairment, or Alzheimers dementia. Hypoperfusion quotes from 38 brain regions were obtained from SPECT, plus temporally resolved verb and noun fluency scores. Factor analysis was used to assess hypoperfusion in larger anatomical regions. Regression analysis was applied to the hypoperfusion factor scores and word fluency data.

Results

Impaired verb fluency was predicted by a temporal lobe hypoperfusion factor and years of education, whereas impaired noun fluency was predicted by age and hypoperfusion in the parietooccipital-parietotemporal region. Hypoperfusion in anteromedial temporal areas were more strongly associated with decreased verb fluency.

Discussion

Impaired verb fluency was predicted by a temporal lobe hypoperfusion factor and years of education, whereas impaired noun fluency was predicted by age and hypoperfusion in the parietooccipital-parietotemporal region. Hypoperfusion in anteromedial temporal areas were more strongly associated with decreased verb fluency.

Authors’ Affiliations

(1)
Neurotec Institution, Karolinska Institute, Sweden

References

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Copyright

© The Author(s) 2006

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