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A 2-year follow-up study of cigarette smoking and risk of dementia

  • Juan Deng1
Annals of General Psychiatry20065(Suppl 1):S194

https://doi.org/10.1186/1744-859X-5-S1-S194

Published: 28 February 2006

Keywords

DementiaMental DisorderCigarette SmokingSmoking StatusElderly People

Background

The report focused on investigating the relationship between cigarette smoking and dementia in elderly people through prospective studies.

Materials and methods

We did a 2-year follow-up study of elderly people. A total of 2820 participants aged 60 years old and over from six communities of Chongqing agreed to take part. Dementia was diagnosed with MMSE (Mini-Mental State Examination) and DSM-III-R (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders). Participants were classified as never smokers, past smokers, and current smokers. During follow-up, we recorded incident cases of dementia. The association of smoking and dementia was investigated using proportional hazards regression analysis.

Results

A total of 121 incident cases of dementia were detected, of which 84 (69%) were Alzheimer's disease, 17 (14%) were vascular dementia, and 21(17%) were other dementia. Compared with never smokers, current smokers had an increased risk of Alzheimer's disease (RR = 2.72; 95% CI = 1.63–5.42) and vascular dementia (RR = 1.98; 95% CI = 1.53–3.12) adjusting for age, sex, education, blood pressure, and alcohol intake. Compared with light smokers, the adjusted risk of Alzheimer's disease was significantly increased among smokers with a medium level of exposure (RR = 2.56; 95% CI = 1.65–5.52), with an even higher risk of Alzheimer's disease in the heavy smoking group (RR = 3.03; 95% CI = 1.25–4.02).

Discussion

Smoking was associated with the risk of dementia. This study suggests that both smoking status and amount is associated with dementia.

Authors’ Affiliations

(1)
2nd Department of Neurology, Daping Hospital, 3rd Military Medical University, China

References

  1. Ott A: Smoking and risk of dementia and Alzheimer's disease in a population-based cohort study: the Rotterdam Study. Lancet. 1998, 351: 1840-1843. 10.1016/S0140-6736(97)07541-7.View ArticlePubMedGoogle Scholar

Copyright

© The Author(s) 2006

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